Tag Archives: Poland

India blank Poland 10-0, set up title clash with Korea in Azlan Shah Cup Hockey

Newsroom24x7 Network

Ipoh (Malaysia): Displaying awesome fire power  India dismantled Poland 10-0  here on Friday to  setup a title clash with former Asian Games champion Korea in the  28th Sultan Azlan Shah Cup hockey.

The final is scheduled to be played on Saturday.

For India who led  6-0 at half time goal scorer were Varun Kmar, Mandeep Singh (two each) ,Vivek Sagar Prasad , Sumit Kumar (Jr) Surender Kumar , Simranjeet Singh , Nilakanta Sharma , and Amit Rohidas (one each)

 Mandeep Singh , who was declared man of the match has so far scored the highest goals (seven) in the tournament followed by team mate  Varun Kumar (five).

India, after finishing the round robin league stage without losing a match, were off to a blistering start taking a 2-0 lead in first  seven minutes of the game .

Vivek Sagar Prasad put India ahead in the first minute and six- minute later  Sumit Kumar’s (Jr) intercepted  Mandeep Singh’s backhand pass in the circle  and slammed the ball into the cave .

The winners totally dominated the proceedings and executed their plans to perfection.India increased the pressure on the rivals who fell back to protect their citadel but that strategy did not help them as  Sumit (Jr)  managed  to earn a penalty corner  in the 18thminute  which was converted by dragflicker Varun Kumar. 

The following minute saw Amit Rohidas  creating an opening which led to a penalty corner.  Surender Kumar made no mistake in sending the ball home.

Despite taking 4-0 lead, there was no relaxing of pressure by the Indians and their lead went up 5-0  in the 24th minute, when Varun Kumar found the target  off a direct, powerful flick.

Simranjeet Singh added to the team’s lead when he worked with Mandeep Singh after receiving a good assist from Nilakanta Sharma to put the ball past Polish goalkeeper Mateusz Popiolkowski. 

With a formidable 6-0 lead at half-time, India continued to dominate with their midfielders playing responsibly, shifting the ball swiftly and fiercely to make space. In the 36th minute, Nilakanta Sharma intercepted a measured cross from Sumit in the circle and deflected it home (7-0). 

The goal line would have been higher but for some brilliant saving the Polish goalkeeper. He cleared and blocked shots taken by Gursahibjit Singh and Simranjeet Singh early in the fourth quarter. A powerfully struck penalty corner by Amit Rohidas too was well-saved by Popiolkowski.

India’s eighth and ninth goal came off skilful displays by Mandeep Singh. He cut through couple of defenders and then foiled   Michal Raciniewski’s attempt to block him and with a direct crack   sent the ball home. His second goal was well-assisted by Gurinder Singh.

The winners completed the tally with Amit Rohidas converting a penalty  corner. 

 

 

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US stand at NATO: Defeating ISIS must be the top priority

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US Secretary of State Rex W. Tillerson at the Meetings of NATO Ministers of Foreign Affairs in Brussels, Belgium on March 31, 2017

Brussels: The U.S. commitment to NATO – an Alliance forged from the ashes of World War II that has remained a necessary defense measure against common threats for more than half a century – is strong and this Alliance remains the bedrock for transatlantic security. At the top of this list, when it comes to facing national and international security challenges, is defeating ISIS, which is a threat to all member countries and partners.

This was emphasised by Rex W. Tillerson, the US Secretary of State at the Meetings of NATO Ministers of Foreign Affairs in Brussels, Belgium this past weekend.

Tillerson also categorically stated that the NATO alliance is also fundamental to countering both non-violent, but at times violent, Russian agitation and Russian aggression. The United States, he further said, is committed to ensuring NATO has the capabilities to support our collective defense. We understand that a threat against one of us is a threat against all of us, and we will respond accordingly. We will uphold the agreements we have made to defend our allies.

To drive home his point, Tillerson said: “These are not just words. Tomorrow, a U.S. enhanced, forward presence battalion will be deployed in Poland.”

Quoting the US President, the Secretary of State said that he Trump has made it clear that it is no longer sustainable for the U.S. to maintain a disproportionate share of NATO’s defense expenditures. He urged the Allies to increase defense spending to meet their commitments in accordance with the Wales Pledge on Defense Investment.

The President supports NATO. The U.S. Congress supports NATO. The U.S. Senate has just overwhelmingly approved Montenegro’s NATO accession protocol. We are now one step closer to welcoming Montenegro as a full member of the Alliance, Tillerson went on to observe.

Tillerson went on to echo what US Defense Secretary James Mattis said at the Defense Ministerial in February: Allies that do not have a concrete plan to spend 2 percent of GDP on defense by 2024 need to establish one now. Allies that have a plan to reach the 2 percent guideline need to accelerate efforts and show results. And for those Allies already spending 2 percent of their GDP on defense, we applaud your efforts and hope you’ll work with us to encourage others to do more.

Our goal should be to agree at the May Leaders meeting that by the end of the year all Allies will have either met the Pledge guidelines or will have developed plans that clearly articulate how, with annual milestone progress commitments, the Pledge will be fulfilled, said Tillerson.

On fighting terrorism, the US Secretary of State said that NATO can and should do more. Fighting terrorism is the top national security priority for the United States, as it should be for all of us.

Tillerson further said:

“After last week’s tragic events in London, the importance of that fight has been made clear yet again. NATO has a number of unique capabilities it can bring to this fight. At the Warsaw Summit last year, NATO members recognized cyberspace as an operational domain, alongside land, air, and sea.

I am encouraged by our efforts so far at cybersecurity and preventing cyberattacks. As ISIS increasingly leverages the internet as a powerful tool for recruitment and propaganda, we must consider how we can disrupt and aggressively counter their online operations.


On Afghansitan

NATO’s work in Afghanistan remains critical. The United States is committed to the Resolute Support Mission and to our support for Afghan forces. NATO’s “Train, Advise, And Assist” mission is essential to our shared goal of ensuring that Afghanistan develops the capability to contribute to regional stability and prevail over terrorist threats, including al-Qaeda and ISIS.

The ongoing commitment of NATO Allies and partners to peace in Afghanistan, including to an eventual settlement between the Afghan government and the Taliban, protects this Alliance’s interests, and, when successful, ensures that Afghanistan never again becomes a safe haven for terrorists.


I want to be clear on one point: we do not believe NATO has to lead everywhere in the fight on terrorism. Others will often have that role, including national governments, the Coalition to Defeat ISIS, or the European Union. But NATO must add value where it can and provide greater support. The security of our people requires it.

As we plan for the May Leaders meeting, the United States is considering what more NATO might do, particularly in bringing stability to Iraq and contributing to the Coalition to Defeat ISIS.

While meeting the challenge of the fight against terrorism, we must remain vigilant in strengthening NATO’s eastern defenses. Allied commitments to Operation Atlantic Resolve and Enhanced Forward Presence have sent a clear message. But long term stability, from Baltic to the Black Sea, depends upon all allies, not just those who are the most exposed, paying their full share for defending the Alliance.

In closing, I repeat the American commitment to this Alliance. The United States will not abandon its allies or forget its friends. Many of the nations in NATO have been working together for decades to protect shared freedoms, shared values, and shared security. But we cannot keep protecting them without meeting our shared responsibility of financial and other resources.

We need to take on the work necessary in the next two months to ensure the May meeting is a success. We look forward to working with all of our NATO allies to accomplish this.”

50 countries do not meet fiscal transparency requirements: US Report

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Department of StateThe US department of State has concluded that, of the 140 governments that were potential beneficiaries of foreign assistance and were evaluated 50 did not meet the minimum requirements of fiscal transparency. Of these, eleven governments made significant progress toward meeting the minimum requirements of fiscal transparency.

On January 14, US Secretary of State John Kerry released the FY 2014 Fiscal Transparency Report, assessing whether governments that receive U.S. assistance meet minimum requirements of fiscal transparency. The Department’s assessments evaluate the substantial completeness, reliability, and public availability of budget documents, as well as the transparency of natural resource extraction contracting and license procedures.

The Report is prepared under Section 7031(b) of the Department of State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 2014. The Report examines governments receiving bilateral allocations of assistance under the Act. In compiling the Report, the Department assessed the fiscal transparency of governments as of the date the Act became law.

Governments meeting fiscal transparency requirements

The Department assessed the following governments as meeting the minimum requirements of fiscal transparency for FY 2014: Albania, Angola, Armenia, Argentina, The Bahamas, Belize, Benin, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Bulgaria, Cabo Verde, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cote d’Ivoire, Croatia, Czech Republic, Djibouti, Ecuador, El Salvador, Estonia, Georgia, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Israel, Jamaica, Jordan, Kenya, Kosovo, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lesotho, Liberia, Lithuania, Macedonia, Malaysia, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Micronesia, Moldova, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Pakistan, Palestinian Authority, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Rwanda, Samoa, Senegal, Serbia, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Uruguay, Vietnam, and Zambia.

The following table lists those governments that were found not to meet the minimum requirements of fiscal transparency and identifies whether the governments made significant progress toward meeting those requirements:

Governments Assessed Pursuant to the Act as not Meeting Minimum Requirements of Fiscal Transparency for FY 2014

Significant Progress

No Significant Progress

Afghanistan

X

Algeria

X

Azerbaijan

X

Bahrain

X

Bangladesh

X

Burkina Faso

X

Burma

X

Burundi

X

Cambodia

X

Cameroon

X

Central African Republic

X

Chad

X

China

X

Comoros

X

Congo, Democratic Republic of the

X

Congo, Republic of the

X

Dominican Republic

X

Egypt

X

Ethiopia

X

Fiji

X

Gabon

X

Gambia, The

X

Guinea

X

Guinea-Bissau

X

Haiti

X

Kazakhstan

X

Laos

X

Lebanon

X

Libya

X

Madagascar

X

Malawi

X

Maldives

X

Nicaragua

X

Niger

X

Nigeria

X

Oman

X

Sao Tome and Principe

X

Saudi Arabia

X

Somalia

X

South Sudan

X

Sudan

X

Suriname

X

Swaziland

X

Tajikistan

X

Tanzania

X

Turkmenistan

X

Ukraine

X

Uzbekistan

X

Yemen

X

Zimbabwe

X

US views fiscal transparency as a critical element of effective public financial management since it helps in building market confidence, and sets the stage for economic sustainability. Transparency also provides a window into government budgets for citizens of any country, helping them to hold their leadership accountable. Reviews of the fiscal transparency of governments that receive U.S. assistance help to ensure that U.S. taxpayer money is used appropriately and sustain a dialogue with governments to improve their fiscal performance, leading to greater macroeconomic stability and better development outcomes, the US department of State goes on to emphasise.

The Office of Monetary Affairs (OMA) monitors global macroeconomic developments and works to prevent and resolve financial crises in countries where U.S. interests are at risk. It seeks to increase the financial security of the United States and its key partners. OMA also works to expand global economic growth and development by advocating sound macroeconomic policies that foster economic stability and expand opportunities for U.S. trade and investment worldwide.

OMA provides the Secretary of State with expertise on global financial and macroeconomic issues, working in close cooperation with the Treasury Department’s Office of International Affairs. OMA is also the Department’s liaison with the International Monetary Fund (IMF). In addition, OMA interacts with a wide range of foreign government officials and representatives of other international and non-governmental organizations. It also consults with representatives of private financial institutions to ensure that U.S. financial interests abroad are accurately and effectively reflected in U.S. foreign economic policy.

To help poorer countries overcome unsustainable debt burdens and improve their chances for economic growth and development, OMA promotes debt relief through the Paris Club, representing the Secretary of State as Head of the U.S. delegation. The Paris Club is the forum for coordinating debt relief policy among sovereign creditors and negotiating individual country debt treatments. Paris Club agreements can also affect non-member country and private sector creditors when debtor countries are required to seek comparable treatment. OMA also coordinates with the Treasury Department to formulate U.S. debt-relief policies more broadly and to promote initiatives through multilateral institutions.

OMA develops strategies to fight corruption and improve transparency from an economic and business perspective. OMA heads the U.S. delegation to the OECD Working Group on Bribery in International Business Transactions, coordinates the interagency to combat bribery of foreign public officials, and ensures compliance with the Convention on Combating Bribery of Foreign Public Officials in Internationals in International Business Transactions, also known as the Anti-Bribery Convention.

Click Here for Government by Government Assessment (Fiscal Transparency Report)