Navika Sagar Parikrama – Women Naval officers to circumnavigate the globe on Indian-built sail boat INSV Tarini 

Newsroom24x7 Staff

Mumbai: Six women officers of the Indian Navy are due to circumnavigate the globe on the sailing vessel, INSV Tarini.

This is the first-ever Indian circumnavigation of the globe by an all-women crew. They will begin their voyage later this month from Goa, and expect to return to Goa in March 2018, after completing the circumnavigation.

The expedition – Navika Sagar Parikrama – will be covered in five legs, with stop-overs at 4 ports: Fremantle (Australia), Lyttleton (New Zealand), Port Stanley (Falklands), and Cape Town (South Africa).

Six women officers of the Indian Navy, who are due to circumnavigate the globe on the sailing vessel, INSV Tarini, called on Prime Minister Narendra Modi on 16 August 2017

The crew of INSV Tarini met Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Wednesday (16 August). The Prime Minister wished the women crew well, and said he would keep track of their progress around the world. He exhorted them to project India’s capabilities and strengths across the world. He also encouraged them to write and share their experiences, after the successful completion of the voyage.

The vessel will be skippered by Lt. Commander Vartika Joshi, and the crew comprises Lt. Commanders Pratibha Jamwal, P Swathi, and Lieutenants S Vijaya Devi, B Aishwarya and Payal Gupta.

The first Indian Solo circumnavigation of the globe was undertaken by Capt Dilip Donde, SC (Retd) from 19 Aug 09 to 19 May 10 onboard the Indian built vessel, INSV Mhadei. The first Indian non-stop solo circumnavigation was undertaken by Cdr Abhilash Tomy, KC from 01 Nov 12 to 31 Mar 13.

The crew of INSV Tarini  comprises of:

S

No

Rank, Name & No. Home Town State Sailing Experience

 

1. Lt Cdr Vartika Joshi, 43077-A Rishikesh Uttarakhand The officer has sailed from Rio De Janeiro to Cape Town in 2014 and from Port Blair – Vizag – Chennai – Kochi onboard Mhadei. She skippered INSV Mhadei from Vizag to Goa in Feb 16, Goa to Mauritius and back from May to Jul 16 and from Goa to Cape Town in Dec 16. The officer also skippered INSV Tarini from Goa to Mauritius and back from May to Jul 17.
2. Lt Cdr Pratibha Jamwal, 07109-F Kullu Himanchal Pradesh The officer has sailed onboard Mhadei from Goa to Port Blair in 2014, Vizag to Goa in Feb 16, Goa to Mauritius and back from May to Jul 16 and from Goa to Cape Town in Dec 16. The officer also sailed onboard INSV Tarini from Goa to Mauritius and back from May to Jul 17.

 

3. Lt Cdr Swathi P,

07234-R

Visakhapatnam Andhra Pradesh   The officer has sailed onboard Mhadei from Cape Town to Goa in 2014, sailed from Vizag to Kochi in Feb 16, Goa to Mauritius and back from May to Jul 16 and from Goa to Cape Town in Dec 16. She also participated in the recently concluded Cape to Rio race 2017. The officer also sailed onboard INSV Tarini from Goa to Mauritius and back from May to Jul 17.
4. Lt Aishwarya Boddapati,

43151-W

Hyderabad Telangana The officer has sailed onboard Mhadei from Vizag to Goa in Feb 16, Goa to Mauritius and back from May to Jul 16 and from Goa to Cape Town in Dec 16. The officer also sailed onboard INSV Tarini from Goa to Mauritius and back from May to Jul 17.
5. Lt Sh Vijaya Devi, 70712-H Moirang Kwakta Santhong Manipur The officer has sailed onboard Mhadei from Goa to Port Blair in 2014, Vizag to Goa in Feb 16, Goa to Mauritius and back from May to Jul 16 and from Goa to Cape Town in Dec 16. The officer also sailed onboard INSV Tarini from Goa to Mauritius and back from May to Jul 17.
6. Lt Payal Gupta,

70724-K

Dehradun Uttrakhand The officer has sailed from Vizag to Goa onboard Mhadei in Feb 16, Goa to Mauritius and back from May to Jul 16 and from Goa to Cape Town in Dec 16. She also participated in the recently concluded Cape to Rio race 2017. The officer also sailed onboard INSV Tarini from Goa to Mauritius and back from May to Jul 17.

The all-women crew have trained extensively for the voyage. They have sailed approximately 20,000 Nm onboard INSV Mhadei and Tarini as part of training, which includes two expeditions to Mauritius (in 2016 and 2017) and a voyage from Goa to Cape Town in December 2016.

INSV Tarini, a 55 foot sailing vessel has been built by M/s Aquarius Shipyard Pvt Ltd, Goa. Tarini was inducted into the Indian Navy on 18 February 2017. The vessel has sailed approximately 8,000 Nm till date.

Navika Sagar Parikrama would be covered in five legs with stop-overs at four ports (same ports as Capt Dilip Donde) for replenishment of ration and repairs as necessary. Estimated dates for the legs are as follows:

Ser Leg Description Cardinal Dates Number of Sailing Days
(a) Goa – Fremantle (Australia) 05 Sep 17 – 12 Oct 17 37
(b) Fremantle (Australia) – Lyttelton (New Zealand)

 

25 Oct 17 – 16 Nov 17 22
(c) Lyttelton (New Zealand) – Port Stanley (Falklands) 23 Nov 17 – 28 Dec 17 35
(d) Port Stanley (Falklands) – Cape Town (South Africa) 10 Jan 18 – 08 Feb 18 28
(e) Cape Town (South Africa) – Goa 21 Feb 18 – 04 Apr 18 42

Additional aims of the Expedition are:

Nari Shakti: In consonance with the National policy to empower women to attain their full potential, the expedition aims to showcase ‘Nari Shakti’ on the world platform. This would also help to discard the societal attitudes and mindset towards women in India by raising visibility of participation by women in challenging environment.

Environment and Climate Change: Sailing encourages the use of environment friendly non-conventional renewable energy resources which affects the life of women. The expedition thereby aims at harnessing the energy to optimise the livelihood of the women onboard.

Make in India: The voyage also aims to show case the ‘Make in India’ initiative by sailing onboard the indigenously built INSV Tarini.

Meteorological/ Ocean/ Wave Data Observation: The crew would also collate and update Meteorological/ Ocean/ Wave data on a daily basis for subsequent analysis by research and development organisations.

Marine Pollution: The crew would monitor and report marine pollution on the high seas.

Interaction with Local PIOs: Since the expedition aims to promote Ocean Sailing and the spirit of adventure, the crew would interact extensively with the local PIOs at the various port halts.

 

 

Probiotic can prevent infections in infants

Dinesh C Sharma

New Delhi: Thousands of infants die due to infections in the first few weeks of their life. A bulk of these deaths can be prevented with an inexpensive probiotic-based preventive therapy developed by a group of Indian and American scientists.

The therapy has been tested in over 4,500 infants from 149 villages in Odisha. Results of this trial, published this week in international journal Nature, show that the probiotic when given orally for one week after birth can reduce sepsis and death by 40 percent. In addition, it also drastically reduces respiratory tract infections. This is the largest ever clinical study of probiotics conducted among new born babies.

Sepsis is a severe complication of bacterial infection that results in around one million infant deaths globally every year.

The preventive therapy is called synbiotic treatment – a combination of probiotic bacteria and a prebiotic nutrient to support the probiotic strain. While probiotics are live micro¬organisms that can provide a health ben¬efit, prebiotics are molecules such as certain carbohydrates in human milk or those derived from plants.

In the Odisha study, the synbiotic prepara¬tion was given daily for one week to full-term born babies when they were two to four days old. The oral preparation contained Lactobacillus plantarum, which had earlier been found to have shown good gut-colonizing properties in newborns, along with fructooligosaccharide, a plant-derived prebiotic.

The therapy was given in addition to breast milk which is known to contain prebiotics as well as other molecules that provide immunity to babies. Only mothers who had started breast feeding their children in their first 24 hours were included in the study.

Follow-up showed that the therapy reduced the risk of sepsis or death by 40 percent. Substan¬tial reductions were seen in all three subtypes of sepsis assessed, and reductions were also observed in diarrhoea and umbilical-stump infection in infants who had not been classified as having sepsis.

“This will reduce the nagging high neonatal mortality and infant mortality in developing countries. More importantly, reduction of such infections during infancy can prevent ‘stunting’ with even more grievous consequences such as reduced cognition and chances of chronic diseases such as hypertension and diabetes in early adulthood,” Pinaki Panigrahi of University of Nebraska Medical Center, who led the research team told India Science Wire. He said it is an affordable intervention as one-week therapy costs just one dollar.

“The trial provides evidence for the effectiveness of a global health interven¬tion that could be used to complement exist¬ing strategies for giving every newborn the best chance to survive and thrive,” pointed out Daniel J. Tancredi of University of California, in a commentary published in the same issue of Nature.

Among the institutes that participated in this study are the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi; Asian Institute of Public Health, Bhubaneswar; Capital Hospital, Bhubaneswar; SCB Medical College, Cuttack; and Ispat General Hospital, Rourkela, besides Universities of Nebraska, Michigan and Maryland. The community-based trial recruited local volunteers to coordinate follow up.

The research team included Pinaki Panigrahi, Sailajanandan Parida, Nimai C. Nanda, Radhanath Satpathy, Lingaraj Pradhan, Dinesh S. Chandel, Lorena Baccaglini, Arjit Mohapatra, Subhranshu S. Mohapatra, Pravas R. Misra, Rama Chaudhry, Hegang H. Chen, Judith A. Johnson, J. Glenn Morris Jr, Nigel Paneth and Ira H. Gewolb. (India Science Wire)


Twitter handle: @dineshcsharma

Indian scientists find how arsenic reduces immunity

Monika Kundu Srivastava

New Delhi: A group of Indian scientists have figured out how exposure to arsenic reduces immunity.

Arsenic’s role in disrupting body’s immune response by hindering development of thymus – gland that helps develop immunity-providing T lymphocytes or T cells– is known. A new study done by scientists from Lucknow-based Indian Institute of Toxicology Research (IITR) has now explained the mechanism behind this.

This may help explain why people exposed to arsenic become susceptible to infections like tuberculosis.

Researchers investigated the effect of arsenic exposure on the process by which T cells transform into specialized cells (CD4+ and CD8+) and the role of regulatory T- cells. CD4+ cells are found on helper T cells and direct the body to fight viral infections, while CD8 are found on fighter T cells that protect the body by killing infected cells.

The study exposed mice in the laboratory to arsenic. It was noticed that arsenic exposure enhanced transformation of T lymphocytes in the thymus into CD4+ cells without affecting the CD8 population. The cells then moved to the spleen and got transformed into regulatory T cells that decreased functional activity of other immune cells and further reduced immunity following arsenic exposure. CD4+ cells got converted into another form and not what they were meant to do. At the same time, secretion of cytokines that help in fighting an infection also decreased.

Researchers also found that treatment with wortmannin – a drug used for cancer treatment – can significantly bring down arsenic-induced increase in regulatory T cell population. It resulted in reversing the effects of reduced immunity by hindering conversion of CD4+ cells to regulatory T cells within the body.

“Our study is significant as it has shown that regulatory T cells can be a potential target to intervene in arsenic-induced immune suppression. This could help in prevention of prevalent infectious diseases in arsenic-affected areas,” pointed out Dr Debabrata Ghosh, who led the research team. Low cost inhibitors can be designed that potentially interfere with regulatory T cells and can be used to reverse effects of reduced immunity in arsenic-affected regions in the country. The study has been published in the journal Scientific Reports.

The research team included Ruchi Gera, Vikas Singh, Sumonto Mitra, Anuj Kumar Sharma, Alok Singh, Arunava Dasgupta, Dhirendra Singh, Mahadeo Kumar, Pankaj Jagdale, Satyam Patnaik and Debabrata Ghosh. (India Science Wire)


Twitter handle:@monikaksrivast1